Norway  coastline with mountains ranges in the background

Cunard

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Oslofjord islands at sunrise
Oslofjord islands at sunrise
Oslofjord islands at sunrise
Oslofjord islands at sunrise

Oslofjord

The waterway approaching Norway's capital city is unique from other fjords on this list in several ways. Firstly, it's situated on the South, not the West, coast of Norway, reaching almost directly northwards to the great city of Oslo. The second way it bucks the trend is by being what’s referred to as an 'urban fjord'. That’s not to say it isn’t naturally formed. Oslofjord, like all of Norway’s fjords, is the product of moving ice and water, however the scenery you’ll encounter here is quite different, thanks, in large, to the towns and villages nestled on its shores. Drink it all in from deck as your ship arrives and departs or get closer to the waterline with a boat tour from Oslo. Alternatively, visit Oslo's opera house. Selected tours include a climb to the roof, from where Oslofjord fjord and Oslo city can be seen in all their combined glory.



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Pulpit Rock, high above Lysefjord: a popular hiking destination in Norway
Pulpit Rock, high above Lysefjord: a popular hiking destination in Norway
Pulpit Rock, high above Lysefjord: a popular hiking destination in Norway
Pulpit Rock, high above Lysefjord: a popular hiking destination in Norway

Lysefjord

Though not frequented by our Cunard Queens, Lysefjord is situated near to one of our most popular ports of call: Stavanger. A bustling town, filled with markets, museums, and historic sites, Stavanger offers no shortage of ways to immerse yourself in authentic Norwegian culture. Steal a few hours away from town to embark on a scenic cruise of Lysefjord Shore Experience (bookable on board or via My Cunard before you sail) or – if you’re feeling adventurous – take a trek to the famous Pulpit Rock (Preikestolen); a large, flat rock face over 600m above the fjord, where you’ll be rewarded with once-in-a-lifetime views.

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Hardangerfjord's mountain peaks and green slopes with mirror-like water..
Hardangerfjord's mountain peaks and green slopes with mirror-like water..
Hardangerfjord's mountain peaks and green slopes with mirror-like water..
Hardangerfjord's mountain peaks and green slopes with mirror-like water..

Hardangerfjord

Cruises through Hardangerfjord unlock opportunities to spy mountain farms, thundering waterfalls, and snow-dusted hilltops as you sail. This part of Norway is known for its apples and cider-making, and visiting in spring, offers the added possibility of seeing fruit trees in full blossom. Although our Norway cruises don't call at any ports along this fjord, there’s still immense joy to be found in gazing out at the passing landscape as you relax on board.

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Sognefjord

Sognefjord is the largest and deepest of Norway’s fjords, stretching 127 miles (205 kilometres) end to end, of which over 1000 metres (3,300 ft) descends to 60 miles in depth. Such a massive channel is almost a world in itself. Home to the signature verdant shores and rugged cliffs, typical of Norway’s fjords, its scale alone is enough to take your breath away. Depending on your itinerary, you could pass down one of two branches of Sognefjord: Lustrafjord and Aurlandsfjord. Given its location between two National Parks, it's perhaps no surprise that Sognefjord always features in round-ups of Norway’s 'most beautiful fjords'. Cruising its shimmering waters may give rise to wildlife spotting. Porpoises, seals, otters, eagles, puffins, and reindeer are all native to this part of Norway and seeing how many you can spot adds yet another dimension to a cruise here.

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View high above Lustrafjord in summer
View high above Lustrafjord in summer
View high above Lustrafjord in summer
View high above Lustrafjord in summer

Lustrafjord

On this branch of Sognefjord, forested slopes, summer meadows, and fruit-bearing farmlands paint the shores. The colours of these, and the waters of the fjord, are particularly stunning, thanks to the meltwater of two glaciers: Nigardsbreen and Jostedalbreen, the largest in continental Europe. Feigumfossen, one of Norway’s highest waterfalls at 700 feet, can be spotted from the decks of your ship and Skjolden, one of many Norwegian ports visited by our fleet, lies at the very end of this fjord. Hiking and watersports are par for the course here, but many visitors choose to experience the wooden Urnes Stave Church, one of 32 of its kind remaining in Norway, and standing since 1130.

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Queen Victoria sailing out of Aurlandsfjord into Sognefjord
Queen Victoria sailing out of Aurlandsfjord into Sognefjord
Queen Victoria sailing out of Aurlandsfjord into Sognefjord
Queen Victoria sailing out of Aurlandsfjord into Sognefjord

Aurlandsfjord

Sailing in Aurlandsfjord, exposes you to an area blessed with uninterrupted natural beauty, thanks to its rocky terrain and modest population. Large parts of this fjord are included in the neighbouring UNESCO World Heritage Site of Nærøyfjord. Cruising Aurlandsfjord brings you to the charming town of Flåm, found at the very end of the channel. Decorated with plentiful walks, a white-sand beach, and a train that’s considered one of the most picturesque rail routes in the world, a port call here is a photographer’s dream.

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Snow-capped mountains frame the beautiful Nordfjord, Norway
Snow-capped mountains frame the beautiful Nordfjord, Norway
Snow-capped mountains frame the beautiful Nordfjord, Norway
Snow-capped mountains frame the beautiful Nordfjord, Norway

Nordfjord

Though it's only the sixth largest in the rankings, Norway's Nordfjord could never disappoint. Quaint villages, misty waterfalls, and rugged cliffs line your ship's path, and beyond those lie mountain lakes, vast forests, and glaciers, millions of years old. Your ship is likely to sail into Nordfjord very early in the morning and exit it early in the evening, giving you not one but two opportunities to see this quintessential Norwegian scene in very different lights. Its countless branches, range from trickling streams to rumbling rivers, to smaller fjords, such as Innnvikfjorden, where tiny villages, clear waters, and hiking trails await exploration and discovery.

At the end of a small branch, halfway along Nordfjord, lies Nordfjordeid, a known Viking settlement. Here, you’ll find nods to various elements of Norwegian history in the local architecture, including the Eid Church, built in 1849, and in several local museums. Nearby, Hornindalsvatnet is another worthwhile visit. Not only is it known as Europe's deepest lake, it also has no glacier flow into it, making it one of the clearest too. Discover beautiful walking trails where you can escape civilisation and lose yourself in nature.

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The forested slopes and silver waters of Innvikfjorden, Mother Nature’s Wonderland
The forested slopes and silver waters of Innvikfjorden, Mother Nature’s Wonderland
The forested slopes and silver waters of Innvikfjorden, Mother Nature’s Wonderland
The forested slopes and silver waters of Innvikfjorden, Mother Nature’s Wonderland

Innvikfjorden

This small-but-perfectly-formed fjord is a treasured branch of Norway's Nordfjord boasting 4.5 kilometres of lush green ridges, trickling waterfalls, and glassy waters. It's this scenery that nicknames this fjord 'Mother Nature's Wonderland'. Look out for seals lying on rocky shores, and keep your binoculars handy to spot seabirds taking off from the clifftops. The best time to take in this fjord is when you enter early morning, when all is misty grey and silent, and the ship slips soundlessly over the waters. Alternatively, get great views after leaving a port call to the village of Olden. As the locals wave you off, relax on deck with a drink of your choice - hot or cold - and take in the scenery as you ponder where to go for dinner.

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Åndalsnes, Norway, on Romsdalsfjord, in summertime
Åndalsnes, Norway, on Romsdalsfjord, in summertime
Åndalsnes, Norway, on Romsdalsfjord, in summertime
Åndalsnes, Norway, on Romsdalsfjord, in summertime

Romsdalsfjord

At 88km (55 miles) long, Romsdalsfjord is the ninth longest fjord in Norway. Known as a 'threshold fjord', it has a distinctive shallow section, separating the sea from the rest of the fjord. As you sail in, see if you can identify the island of Veøya, known as 'the holy island'. The island sits at the intersection of the three main branches of the fjord, and was a medieval trading hub. A church from the 12th century still stands, and occasionally hosts services to this day. At the mouth of Romsdalsfjord you can visit Molde, a bustling port town with a white cathedral and local markets, whereas at its end you can visit picturesque Åndalsnes, home to the Troll Ladder: a zigzag road up the cliffside with magnificent views across the fjord, and the route to Stigfossen Waterfall.

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Just one of the many waterfalls seen along Geirangerfjord, on a summer's day.
Just one of the many waterfalls seen along Geirangerfjord, on a summer's day.
Just one of the many waterfalls seen along Geirangerfjord, on a summer's day.
Just one of the many waterfalls seen along Geirangerfjord, on a summer's day.

Geirangerfjord

This fjord is on the UNESCO World Heritage List for good reason, More waterfalls line its shores than many other fjords, the waters of which transition from blue to green, depending on the day and season. It's also a treasure trove of winding trails, historic sites, and awe-inspiring viewpoints. Experiencing Geirangerfjord from the water is unrivalled by land or by air. Sit on deck with a warm coffee as you sail in early morning, take a kayaking Shore Experience to truly experience the scale of the fjord, or enjoy some locally-inspired dishes on board as you sail away in style. Stopping off at Geiranger itself opens up the possibility of some watersports or hiking. Alternatively, head to nearby Viking port, Hellsylt, to see the waterfall rumbling through the centre of town.

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Ofotfjord, Norway
Ofotfjord, Norway
Ofotfjord, Norway
Ofotfjord, Norway

Ofotfjord

Located in the northernmost reaches of Norway's west coast, 200km above the Arctic Circle, Ofotfjord is often surrounded by snowy mountains and dense forests. In the air, white-tailed eagles soar on a search for prey, while oystercatchers and grey herons pepper the wake in the summer. The large herring population makes Ofotfjord a popular place to spot orca, particularly in the winter months. Along with the fish, shipwrecks and relics of naval battles have also found their home beneath the water. The port city of Narvik is found here, a perfect base from which to explore historic local sites, nearby wildlife centre, Polar Park, or even take a cable car and try skiing.

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