Australia & South Pacific cruises

Australasia is a region of contrasts. A choice of Australia cruises with Cunard may showcase rainforests in the north and stunning beaches and cosmopolitan cities in the south, which give way to a vast interior and huge ranches. New Zealand boasts towering mountains and verdant valleys, washed by tumbling waterfalls.

Experiences

There’s a sense of mystique on a Cunard cruise to Australasia. It may stem from the impossibly beautiful Polynesian lagoons, watching Fiji’s firewalkers or meeting the tribes of Papua New Guinea. It could be seeing Australia’s weird and wonderful wildlife up close, including koalas, kangaroos and crocodiles, or even snorkelling at the majestic Great Barrier Reef. From our New Zealand cruises, it may be a performance of the Maori haka, ascending Auckland’s Sky Tower or sailing into breathtaking fjords that most define your visit.

History

Australasia’s history is inextricably linked to that of the UK. Mass emigration from the UK sowed the seed for today’s growing population, and Australia’s links to the Commonwealth are still strong. Meanwhile, the relative isolation and self-reliance of the Pacific Islands has helped maintain a traditional way of life and a strong identity still very much in evidence.

Culture

In fact, this sense of identity is very strong right across the Pacific and Australasia, with indigenous art and performances celebrated throughout the region. A visit to a Pacific Island will undoubtedly lead to you enjoying traditional tribal performances. Of course, modern culture plays a big role too – the Opera House in Sydney is hugely popular, and New Zealand boasts perhaps the most famous film sets in the world, thanks to Lord of the Rings.

Cuisine

Australia is known for its barbecues and outdoor dining, while New Zealand cuisine owes much to the British. Saying that, Far Eastern and Pacific influences make the menu an eclectic affair in both countries. On the Pacific Islands, you’ll find an emphasis on locally sourced food. Expect freshly caught fish and home grown meats, served with local vegetables and sweet fruit – delicious!

  • Sydney Opera House
  • Auckland
  • Whitsunday Islands
  • Wellington, New Zealand
  • Tauranga, New Zealand

Location

Featured cruises to Australasia and the Pacific Islands

  • Southampton to Fremantle

    Featured Cruise

    Thu 3 Jan to 04 Feb 2019

    Southampton to Fremantle

    Queen Elizabeth

    32 nights from $4,199 per person

  • San Francisco to Sydney

    Featured Cruise

    Wed 6 Feb to 27 Feb 2019

    San Francisco to Sydney

    Queen Victoria

    21 nights from $3,949 per person

  • Fort Lauderdale To Southampton

    Featured Cruise

    Mon 21 Jan to 27 Apr 2019

    Fort Lauderdale To Southampton

    Queen Victoria

    96 nights from $19,649 per person

Australasia & Pacific Islands

Available cruises: 121

Wonderful places to visit

Australasia’s history is inextricably linked to that of the UK. Mass emigration from the UK sowed the seed for today’s growing population, and Australia’s links to the Commonwealth are still strong. Meanwhile, the relative isolation and self-reliance of the Pacific Islands has helped maintain a traditional way of life.

American Samoa

From the moment you first glimpse the islands that make up American Samoa, you will realise that it is a place of immense beauty. Lusciously green, mist-shrouded mountains tower over deep blue bays, where marine life teems below the surface. With natural splendour to rival destinations such as Bora Bora, American Samoa is still relatively unknown to tourists, which gives visitors the sense that they have discovered a truly hidden gem in the South Pacific Ocean. When arriving on a cruise to American Samoa, do not be surprised if you are welcomed by Samoans in a traditional ‘Ava ceremony that includes drinking a relaxing beverage made from the ‘Ava (sometimes called kava) root. Pago Pago is the capital of American Samoa, and one of the biggest settlements - although it is better described as a village than a city. Located on Tutuila, Pago Pago (pronounced Pango Pango) is a serene harbour town encircled by dramatic green mountains and pristine sandy beaches. North Pioa Mountain, one of the mountains that provides a dramatic backdrop to Pago Pago, is frequently shrouded in rain clouds, resulting in the mountain being nicknamed The Rainmaker. It is this frequent rain that makes the whole island come alive in various brilliant shades of green throughout the year.

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